The Nobuo Ishibashi Memorial Museum What is the Nobuo Ishibashi Memorial Museum?

Introduction

Visitors to the museum can view exhibits detailing the life and achievements of Nobuo Ishibashi, the founder of Daiwa House Industry, a pioneer of the prefabricated housing industry who died at the age of 81 after making numerous contributions to improving the standards of living of the Japanese public. Mr. Ishibashi nurtured in his breast a dream in which Japanese society would make major advances, and as a step toward this goal he became a standard-bearer for the industrialization of construction. We believe the material presented in this museum will enable visitors to feel and understand for themselves Mr. Ishibashi's personality and his aspirations for the company he founded and for society as a whole.

Takeo Higuchi, Chairman and CEO
Keiichi Yoshii, President and COO
Daiwa House Industry Co., Ltd.

The main theme of the museum – Nobuo Ishibashi's dream

Daiwa House founder Nobuo Ishibashi pursued his dream from an early age right to the end of his life. We are the inheritors of his indomitable spirit, and it is our mission to continue marching step-by-step toward a better future, in pursuit of that wonderful dream.

The Chinese character shown above means “dream.” In Japanese, it is pronounced yume (yoo-meh). The word “dream” encompasses a wide range of meanings. When we go to sleep at night, we dream. We also often refer to the past as “seeming like a dream.” But for us at the Daiwa House Group, these definitions of the word can be put to one side. When we use the word “dream,” which to us is very important, we are referring to hopes for the future. Dreams are the driving force behind great achievements. Managers must be a good judge of the capabilities of their staff. Employees, too, must have a dream in their hearts. Companies grow along with the realization of such dreams. A company’s management and staff must all keep on trying to make their dream reality, and must never give up. October 1963: By Yoshino Lake


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